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Lake Union in Seattle WA

Things To Do in Seattle – Lake Union

Lake Union in Seattle, WA

Lake Union is a saltwater lake in Seattle, WA. It’s the third largest of all lakes within Puget Sound and was once home to Native Americans who used it as a trading post for centuries before Europeans discovered it. Today, it stands as an icon that reflects this city’s history and natural beauty that rises from the waters.

A great deal can be seen moving across this lake via one or more floating bridges built over each arm, separating them from their respective landmasses. In contrast, numerous smaller bridges span these same arms allowing access between roadways located on either side of the lake.

Lake Union is a freshwater lake in Seattle, Washington. It has many public transportation options, including the streetcar, which you can ride for free to get from downtown to Lake Union and back! You will also see people kayaking on the lake and rowing boats with their boathouse right there on the water’s edge. If you want something more relaxing than biking or walking along with one of the city’s great greenways, then you can sit back and take a boat ride. There is even an old steamboat that still runs around the lake and numerous rental boats available to the public.

History of the Lake Union

On the United States’ West Coast, Lake Union in Seattle, Washington was once a shallow glacial freshwater lake. The city of Seattle has grown up around Lake Union, and it is an essential part of its history. Before Europeans settled in the area, Native Americans lived near Lake Union for centuries before European settlement. A new dam built across Portage Creek made this one large body of water which would be named after David Denny’s friend Samuel S Lake who owned most of what is now known as Capitol Hill’s streets east from Volunteer Park, including John McGilvra, Marion St., Lynn St., Melrose Ave., Olive Way (pre-dating Aurora), Terry Avenue Addition through Madison Park Later another small hill between this lake and Lake Washington was named after him as well. The first non-Native American settler in the Seattle area, a White man from Kentucky by the name of Henry Van Asselt who built his cabin on Westlake Avenue near where it intersects with Denny Way at about what is today Boren Ave., but he would soon move up to another small glacial hill now known as Leschi Park which overlooked this newly formed larger body of water. David Denny joined them within several years, followed quickly by Arthur A. Denny across the valley on a bluff later called Capitol Hill (and originally Beacon Hill). Their streets were carved out, naming many for those early settlers, including an extension eastward that became John & Thomas Streets Addition through Madison Park.

The Lake Union in Seattle, Washington, was formed from the waters of Puget Sound when a dam built across Portage Creek made this one large body of water with two connecting lakes to its east and west. Native Americans lived near Lake Union for centuries before European settlement by Henry Van Asselt. He settled on Westlake Avenue near where it intersects today with Denny Way just south of Boren Ave. Still, he would soon move up to another small glacial hill known as Leschi Park, which overlooked this newly formed larger body of water. David Denny joined them within several years, followed quickly by Arthur A. Denny across the valley on a bluff later called Capitol Hill (and originally Beacon Hill). Their streets were carved out, naming many for those early settlers, including an extension eastward that became John & Thomas Streets Addition through Madison Park.

Today Lake Union in Seattle, WA, is home to several shipyards and marinas as well as the center of a large maritime industry which includes seaplane operations (Kenmore Air Harbor) on its southern shore at Kenmore along with Boeing’s largest airplane assembly plant, which sits just south of the Ship Canal connecting it to Puget Sound near where they both meet Shilshole Bay. A great deal of traffic can be seen moving across this lake via one or more floating bridges built over each arm, separating them from their respective landmasses. In contrast, numerous smaller-sized bridges span these same arms allowing access between roadways located on either side of the lake.

Things To do in Lake Union

Lake Union is a bustling business and leisure hub, with plenty to see and do for locals and visitors alike. From scenic views to unique shopping opportunities, Lake Union has it all. If you’re looking for something new to try in the area, here are five things you should add to your bucket list!

1) Visit Gas Works Park: This park offers fantastic views of the Seattle skyline, as well as a fascinating history involving old gasification plants that operated on this site from 1906-1956. There’s also a cafe within the park if you need a quick refuel before heading out again!

2) Take a Sailboat Ride on Lake Union: Boats have been used to get around the area for many years. You can take this mode of transport yourself by hiring out one of the sailboats available for rent!

3) Go Shopping at the Lakeshore Ave A.C. Moore: This specialty craft store offers an impressive selection of arts and crafts supplies, as well as a variety of classes for those who want to perfect their technique before venturing out on their own!

4) Get a Bird’s Eye View of Lake Union: Seattle is a city that offers a plethora of ways to enjoy the spectacular views it has to offer, and you can now add another option to your list by hiring one of the many helicopters available for tours around Lake Union!

5) Take a Cruise on the Lake Union Princess: This boat has been offering tours of Seattle from many different perspectives for more than thirty years. Cruises include sight-seeing options that pass some of Seattle’s most famous landmarks and special dinner/lunch cruises for those who want to enjoy their trip in style!

How to visit the Lake Union

Lake Union in Seattle, Washington, is located just east of downtown between its northern shore at Broad St., Westlake Ave., and Fairview Ave. It was formed from the waters of Puget Sound when a dam built across Portage Creek made this one large body of water with two connecting lakes to its east and west. Today Lake Union in Seattle, WA, provides much-needed waterfront property for various business activities as well as an essential part of their history along with many other surrounding neighborhoods named after early settlers, including but not limited to Fremont (named for John C Fremont), Cascade District, Eastlake (for Arthur Denny’s friend George W Eastlake who had earlier founded Columbus); Queen Anne Hill; Capitol Hill & Madison Park along with Lake Union.

Visiting the Lake Union in Seattle, WA, is straightforward by car due to its proximity to downtown, where parking can be found almost anywhere within a block or two from the lake itself, which makes it ideal for walking around taking in all the sites and sounds coming off this beautiful body of water. Most importantly, visitors should make sure they take advantage of all the free tours available for this lake, including a narrated boat tour (Lake Union Cruise) offered by Argosy Cruises that leaves from both Pier 55 and Seacrest Park.

Another critical thing to point out about Lake Union in Seattle, WA, is its proximity to one of three locks built on the West Coast, allowing boats access between Puget Sound & Salmon Bay while also providing an easy way to move cargo up & downhill when water levels are high or low depending upon what season it may be at any given time with them currently being open roughly 260 days each year. However, they were opened 178 days during 2013 due primarily to our current drought conditions across most Western Washington State, especially around Olympia, where their snowpack is now at only 57% of normal.

The final and most important thing to point out about Lake Union in Seattle, WA is that it’s the main focus around the annual Seafair celebration held each July, which includes hydroplane races (at least they used too), sailing regattas as well as a big air show featuring both military & civilian aircraft along with many other activities including but not limited to parades & parties. The best way for visitors interested in attending these events is by taking advantage of unique shuttles leaving from downtown hotels or anywhere else within walking distance of their nearest stop providing transportation directly to either Gas Works Park located on the north end running roughly parallel across its northern shore or at Key Arena near Seattle Center where all this activity takes place.

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