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Klondike Gold Rush National Historical in Seattle WA

Things To Do in Seattle – Klondike Gold Rush National Historical

The Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in Seattle, WA

The Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park is the only national park in the United States that commemorates a historical event. The story of this country’s last major gold rush is preserved at this beautiful location on Seattle’s waterfront, near Pike Place Market.
It consists of several sites near or on Alaskan Way, including Chilkoot Trail, Dyea Site, Excursion Inlet Mines and Discovery Claim, The Scales House Museum at Pioneer Square, Malaspina Expedition Sites (Ballaine and Reid), Monte Cristo Townsite, Kennecott Mill Townsite/Eagle Cliff Mine Ruins, and Kentuck Knob Fire Lookout Tower. The national historical park was established in 1967 to interpret the history of prospectors from Alaska during the 1897–1898 Klondyke gold rush. Visitors can walk through recreations of a gold mining dredge, which was once used to mine for gold in the area.

There are short trails at the park that lead hikers through an alpine forest and down along cliff sides with great views of Puget Sound. The Scales House Museum is also located within the national historical park, showing what life was like for those living during this period. Visitors can attend ranger-led programs throughout the year to learn more about how prospectors lived their lives or took part in winter activities such as skiing or snowshoeing.

History of Klondike Gold Rush National Historical

The park was established in 1967 to interpret the history of prospectors from Alaska during the 1897–1898 Klondyke gold rush. Visitors can walk through recreations of a gold mining dredge, which was once used to mine for gold in the area. Once thriving mining town – Dawson City, which had its peak population of around 25000 residents today, serves as an essential destination/tourist attraction for visitors interested in learning more about life during the turn of the century in the north. The park also features a replica of an 1898 Nome saloon, samples of gold ore and pay dirt (earth that contains enough gold to be profitable), several restored buildings, including Skagway Post Office, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, along with three other buildings.

The history behind Klondike Goldrush lasts for three years in 1897–1898, which saw thousands of people rushing into Alaska from Canada & the US seeking gold. Still, only a few made it big while many returned empty-handed because some struck it rich by discovering gold chunks while some lived their dream by searching through the gold dust and nuggets in creek beds.

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, visitor center exhibits, provide a good overview of the history of this area during 1897-1915 before Alaska was purchased from Russian Empire through an auction by United States Government for just $US 0.02 cents per acre or roughly $US 750 million / 61 thousand square miles in total today’s equivalent value. However, it wasn’t until 1947 that Alaskan citizens were allowed statehood as 49th State into Union under President Harry S Truman’s administration.

The Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park tells the story of the gold rush era starting from 1897 to 1899 when thousands of prospectors flocked this area during the Klondike Gold Rush after a significant amount of gold was discovered on Rabbit Creek (later renamed Bonanza Creek), a tributary of the Yukon River.

Klondike Goldrush lasted for about three years, and many individuals returned home empty-handed while some struck it rich with their discoveries.* Once thriving mining town – Dawson City, which had its peak population of around 25000 residents today, serves as an essential destination/tourist attraction for visitors interested in learning more about life during the turn of the century in the north.

The park also features a replica of an 1898 Nome saloon, samples of gold ore and pay dirt (earth that contains enough gold to be profitable), several restored buildings, including the Skagway Post Office, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places along with three other buildings.

What to see on Klondike Gold Rush National Historical in Seattle?

There are short trails at the park that lead hikers through an alpine forest and down along cliff sides with great views of Puget Sound. The Scales House Museum is also located within the national historical park, showing what life was like for those living during this period. Visitors can attend ranger-led programs throughout the year to learn more about how prospectors lived their lives or took part in winter activities such as skiing or snowshoeing.

The park offers various exhibits about the gold rush, including some authentic items from that period. Visitors can also learn more about events like Stampede on White Pass and Chilkoot Trails by watching an audio-visual show at Theatre in the Park (located next to Pioneer Square). For those who want a unique experience, there are even special tours available through companies like Skagway Excursions or Alaska Travel Adventures for people interested in traveling back into time with their eyes closed!

The park itself does have several historical buildings from before and after the gold rush period. These include a former post office building, jailhouses, warehouses, etc. which provide a good glimpse into how life was lived during those days. You will also find restored cabins inside, where exhibits show items related to everyday lives back then. This makes it easier to imagine being there once upon a time.

For those interested in the gold rush trails, you will find many maps and displays along the way. This shows where people came from to eventually get here as well as what different routes were taken. Even though Seattle is not far off now, it was still considered remote back then, seen by these facts alone. There are also exhibits that show how life after the gold rush was once again lived here too!

The park has a self-guided tour route, but if you want more help for this or any other aspect of your visit, there are Ranger-guided tours at specific times throughout the day. These cover various aspects of this particular period of history, so make sure to check them out when signing up for your ticket!

Things to do in Klondike Gold Rush National Historical:

Watch the gold panning demonstrations, see how they did it back then, and get a feel for what it was like during that period.

View the exhibits and films at the visitor center.

See a film about Seattle during Gold Rush times.

Watch gold panning demonstrations on weekends.

Take an underground mine tour.

See the restored cabins and buildings.

See artifacts from Gold Rush times.

Hike one of two trails (one is an easy walk, one is strenuous).

Visit a territorial prison site that was moved to this location.

Ride the park’s train (runs on weekends between October and May; runs daily during summer months).

Things not to do Klondike Gold Rush National Historical:

Do not drink the water

Do not eat or play with any plants. All you can find there are historical artifacts!

Do not leave any garbage behind.

Do not damage anything on the site. Everything there is historical!

Locations of Klondike Gold Rush National Historical

Address of Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park: 319 2nd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104, United States. Phone number: +12062204240.  Hours of Operation Friday – Sunday: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM.

Website: Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park

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