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Seattle Neighborhood – Yesler Terrace

The Yesler Terrace Neighborhood

 

Yesler Terrace is a neighborhood in Seattle that was once the site of one of America’s first public housing projects. It’s now being redeveloped to include affordable homes for low-income residents, as well as commercial space and community parks.

 

Yesler Terrace is a historic part of Seattle, home to one of America’s first public housing projects. It now includes commercial space and park areas for locals to explore. Freeway Park, which features beautiful fountains and several pieces of public art, can be found nearby as well as many historical spots within walking distance from this area such as Occidental Square where you can learn about early Seattle history through an interactive map installation called Mapping Washington: A Portrait in Time. The square itself was once used by blacksmiths during the Gold Rush era, while the nearby Pioneer Square is home to the oldest buildings in Seattle.

 

About the Yesler Terrace Neighborhood

 

Yesler Terrace is a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington. It was the first public housing project built in the city. It became home to over half of Seattle’s African American community at its peak while becoming synonymous with poverty and crime for many years after. In recent times it has been renamed Holgate Manor-Cedar Valley Community Village.

 

The area was once known as Yesler Way Slough. After regarding efforts by Henry Yesler, this part of First Hill no longer exists underwater during high tide. The rich soil that resulted from his efforts attracted settlers who founded a mill town on the north end of Lake Union called Mill Town or Cascade City. The area was annexed into the City of Seattle in 1891.

 

The Yesler Terrace housing project was the first public housing project built in Seattle. The housing project opened its doors on March 21, 1940. It became home to over half of Seattle’s African American community at its peak while becoming synonymous with poverty and crime for many years after. In recent times it has been renamed Holgate Manor-Cedar Valley Community Village.

 

History of Yesler Terrace Neighborhood

 

Yesler Terrace was initially built in 1939 on the site of a former lumber town. It provided low-income housing to many residents who worked at local factories, including Boeing Aircraft Company (now known as Spirit AeroSystems). The neighborhood’s name comes from Henry Yesler, one of Seattle’s founders and its first mayor. He owned a sawmill and steam-powered mill in this part of town.

 

In the early 2000s, Yesler Terrace was included in America’s most distressed public housing projects. It underwent redevelopment from 2005 to 2014 with funding from local government agencies and federal programs such as Hope VI. As a result, many low-income tenants were given Section Eight vouchers to help them afford homes elsewhere or remained in newly created affordable units. In addition, new stores have been added for residents to shop at, including banks and grocery stores which had previously not been available in the area before.

 

Today, Yesler Terrace is known for its rich diversity and thriving community. It’s home to various cultures, including Vietnamese, Somali Bantu, Cambodian, Chinese and more! This page lists some fun things to do in the area, such as visiting International District, which offers many delicious restaurants like Thai Tom. There are also great parks nearby like Freeway Park, which features beautiful fountains and several pieces of public art. Lastly, many historical spots within walking distance from Yesler Terrace, such as Occidental Square, where one can learn about early Seattle history through an interactive map installation called Mapping Washington: A Portrait in Time. The square itself was once used by blacksmiths during the Gold Rush era, while the nearby Pioneer Square is home to the oldest buildings in Seattle.

 

What happened to Yesler Terrace Neighborhood?

 

Yesler Terrace was a low-income housing development in Seattle, Washington. It is located on the eastern slope of First Hill between Yesler Way and Jackson Street to the north and south and Boren Avenue and Interstate 90 to the east and west.

 

In 1941 it had 164 buildings with nearly 1000 units which were home to about 2800 people. In addition, there have been schools, shops, parks & churches present in this neighborhood.

 

Today, most of its area is being demolished, but some parts still exist with improved community facilities like new houses, public spaces, etc. There have been many social problems occurring in this place during the last decades because of poverty issues or racial unrests affecting mostly communities of African Americans and immigrants.

 

The Yesler Terrace was also considered a vital place of the Seattle civil rights movement during the 1950s and 1960s. Now it is known as Little Saigon & International District because most of its population has moved out to find better living conditions in other neighborhoods or suburbs around Seattle.

 

Facts about the Yesler Terrace Neighborhood

 

A brief history of the Yesler Terrace Seattle neighborhood is a bit difficult to pin down. Many people don’t even know what it was, and most think that it has been wholly eradicated from Seattle’s landscape. However, there are some remnants leftover if you look hard enough!

 

The first thing you should know is that the area known as Yesler Terrace was originally a large hill located just outside of downtown. It is one of Seattle’s seven hills, making it prone to landslides and floods – which turned out to be disastrous for many people living in the area. As time went on, there were efforts to flatten the hill and make it suitable for human settlement. An extensive public housing development was erected on top of Yesler Hill, now called Yesler Terrace. This area has been home to many different people throughout history – from Chinese laborers during the gold rush era who lived in shantytowns near Pioneer Square to African Americans displaced by urban renewal programs later on. The changing demographics are reflected by the names given to this place over time: Little Africa, Skid Road/Skid Row, International District (ID), etc.

 

The solution would be that there should be a lot more effort to make these places better so that they can become thriving communities again! If you have ideas about what could help revitalize Yesler Terrace, you can contact the City of Seattle’s Department of Neighborhoods.

 

Henry Yesler’s dream turned into a nightmare that led to many abandoned buildings, crime rates skyrocketing in surrounding areas, and community members uprooting their families from this unplanned development which ultimately became too much to handle to deal with. The population declined rapidly as people moved out of what once had been affordable housing, and the ambitious idea collapsed under its weight over time due in part to a lack of funding or interest by anyone else anytime soon! As you probably guessed, there is not one person alive today who will tell you anything good about living here back when it was still around. It has become somewhat forgotten because we didn’t learn any lessons from the mistakes of those who came before us.

 

The Yesler Terrace neighborhood was a good idea. It just wasn’t well planned or executed right at all, and that is what doomed it from the start! With this in mind, though, we need to consider how important our neighborhoods are going forward as our population continues to increase rapidly. There needs not to be another Yesler Terrace Seattle neighborhood failure again, thanks mainly due to lack of planning both by those running these new developments and those buying homes there during this time.

 

Yesler Terrace was once a great idea to build affordable homes for people looking to get started in life here in Seattle. Still, the lack of proper planning ended up turning this place into something no one wants to remember or even acknowledge today! As we look towards what will happen with our future neighborhoods across the Puget Sound region, these lessons will hopefully play out differently than they did back then.

 

It has largely disappeared from memory, but it still exists if you look hard enough! If anyone wants to know more about what happened on Yesler Terrace or in similar neighborhoods around our region during this time, they should seek out people who lived through those times themselves and ask them what they remember. It is essential to know about our past to understand how we got here today.

 

Activities in Yesler Terrace Neighborhood

 

The Yesler Terrace neighborhood of Seattle is a unique and historically significant community, but it has not been well-known for many years. However, the area is now an essential part of both local history and development in downtown Seattle. The Yesler Way Community Historical Project (YCCHP) was founded to preserve and revitalize the small enclave at 24th Avenue South by organizing tours, lectures, and other programs that celebrate its rich past as one of America’s first “garden city” communities explicitly built with African Americans in mind.

 

As mentioned above, events organized by YCCHP are available throughout the year on various topics to help visitors get a better understanding of the history behind this unique community.

 

Pioneer Square

For those interested in learning more about Yesler Terrace, there is an annual celebration called Jog-A-Thon that features speakers and tours focused on different aspects of this particular neighborhood. Additionally, YCCHP has frequent walking tours throughout the year that last approximately two hours and provide guests with information related to all types of activities within the Yesler Terrace area, including shopping venues, housing styles, and historical sites Pioneer Square or The International District.

 

These may be given as part of community outreach programs or at various venues around Seattle, including libraries, senior centers, and other places where people congregate. So if you are looking for exciting things to do when in the city, consider taking a tour or attending one of the educational events offered by YCCHP. Their mission is simple but powerful: “to preserve Yesler Terrace’s history while fostering its revitalization.” And with so many great offerings available throughout the year, it won’t be long until you too will want to come back again!

 

El Centro de la Raza

The YCCHP provides periodic presentations on various topics related to the history and culture of Yesler Terrace. These may be given as part of community outreach programs or at multiple venues around Seattle, including libraries, senior centers, and other places where people congregate. For those visitors looking for some additional insight into what life was like during this critical period, historical exhibits are available at El Centro de la Raza and Seattle’s Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI). The organization also has frequent walking tours throughout the year that last approximately two hours, providing guests with information about shopping venues, housing styles, and historical sites like Pioneer Square or The International District.

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