Things To Do in Seattle – The Center for Wooden Boats

The Center for Wooden Boats in Seattle WA

The Center for Wooden Boats is a nonprofit organization that preserves, restores, and operates historic wooden boats. They are dedicated to educating people of all ages about the history of boats made from wood and sharing their knowledge with those who want to learn more. The Center offers boat rides on Lake Union in Seattle, where visitors can experience life aboard these vessels.

The Center for Wooden Boats is a fantastic place to visit in Seattle! There are so many classes and events you can attend, but they also have plenty of open boats for people to enjoy. The views from the Center aren’t too shabby either if you want to do some sightseeing by boat or relax after a day at the market. If anyone has any further questions, please feel free to ask me about my experiences there!

History of The Center for Wooden Boats

The Center for Wooden Boats was started in 1998 by volunteers with hundreds of wooden boats to share. They wanted to promote an appreciation for maritime history, people who build small wooden boats, and those who teach young children about this love through hands-on experience. Now it is one of Seattle’s most popular tourist attractions and the most extensive collection of its kind outside England, with over 2000 members! You can even sit back, relax, and enjoy your favorite drink here while relaxing around the fire pit after a long day at work or visiting some nearby sites like Pike Place Market, where seafood lovers will flock every day for fresh seafood.

Not only do they teach people about wooden boats, but it’s also dedicated to sharing history and culture. They promote the arts of boatbuilding and make sure to educate everyone on why we should care. The Center has programs you can take part in like: classes for adults and children which teaches how to build your wooden boat or what materials are best suited; private events such as birthday parties, weddings, etc.; free community days where anyone can come to check out all their unique boats; adult nights every Thursday when admission is $20 at the door after you sign up online (which includes drinks); family night with music from local bands held once a month during summer months that also includes food and beverages; any classes they have throughout the year that you can sign up for on their website.

Activities in The Center for Wooden Boats

The Center for Wooden Boats is a Seattle gem with plenty of activities, classes, and events that everyone can enjoy! They are located in the heart of Lake Union Park near Gas Works Park, where you have terrific views of downtown Seattle as well as the Cascades on a clear day. It’s an excellent place to spend your free time at or even book out one of their boats if you want to relax by yourself or go fishing with friends & family.

It offers various fun activities that everyone will enjoy. They offer boat-building classes, sailboat rentals, and kayak lessons. You can even take a class to learn how to row or try your hand at canoeing. There are summer camps available for kids ages five through twelve to explore the city’s rich maritime history while having fun on Lake Union.

Suppose you are interested in renting boats over the weekend or taking an afternoon out of town. In that case, there is no better way than with one of their rental options, which include paddleboats, rowboats, yachts, motorized skiffs, and electric pontoon boats, all available from mid-May until early September, depending upon weather conditions. When it comes to family-friendly activities, Seattle has something special here that everyone will enjoy! If you have never been before, be sure to check it out.

They also offer adult classes that they regularly scheduled throughout the year. Another popular class is the Opera on Boats, where you come and enjoy a night of opera music while floating around Lake Union. Many classes focus on woodworking which is suitable for adults who are interested in this craft or hobby.

From rowboats to kayaks, there is something for everyone here. They are all available for rent, so if you are interested in boats, this might be an excellent place to go ahead and try out one of their vessels. You can also look forward to watching a boat race held every year in Puget Sound.

There are also many free events held at The Center for Wooden Boats, such as workshops and talks about boats or woodworking tools, so be sure to check those out too when planning your trip.

Facts about The Center for Wooden Boats

When visitors first come into the museum, they will be greeted by some beautiful model ships made out of wood and other examples demonstrating how early sailors lived aboard their vessels while at sea for extended periods. There’s even an exhibit dedicated solely to sailing history which features old photos taken during expeditions across different parts of the world.

Visitors who enjoy boating and working with their hands will find plenty of activities that they can do here, including learning how to build a model boat or practicing the art of traditional ropework by tying knots like sailors used to on old clippers and whaling ships. The center for wooden boats also has several live demonstrations throughout the day, which show visitors what it takes to work as part-time crew members on private docks such as those found in Seattle, where people use yachts, houseboats, and other vessels for recreational purposes.

The Wooden Boat Festival at Seattle Center also takes place here, where you can see different types of boats on display and watch them compete against each other to win awards!
There are over 100 different types of small wooden vessels that they keep in the boathouse.

The biggest attraction of all at The Center for Wooden Boats has to be their large fleet of boats.
Boatbuilding is one trendy class where students can learn how to build a wooden boat from scratch! You will need to register early if this is something that interests you.

Location

It is located at 1010 Valley St, Seattle, WA 98109, United States.
It opens from Wednesday through Sunday from 11 am to 7 pm. Admission is always free! These are some cool things you can do at the center for wooden boats during one visit or many visits over time!

Address: 1010 Valley St, Seattle, WA 98109, United States
Hours:
Monday Closed
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday 10am–6pm
Thursday 10am–6pm
Friday 10am–6pm
Saturday 10am–6pm
Sunday 10am–6pm

Phone: +1 206-382-2628
Website: cwb.org

If you’re looking for House Cleaning Service in Seattle, you can book with us!

Next Thing To Do in Seattle:

Kubota Garden

 

The Center for Wooden Boats in Seattle WA

 

NW Maids Cleaning Service

Things To Do in Seattle – Kubota Garden

Kubota Garden in Seattle WA

Kubota Garden in Seattle is one of the city’s best-kept secrets. It’s not just a garden; it’s an experience! Nestled on 5 acres of land, Kubota Garden is home to three distinct parks with over 7,000 square feet of space for visitors to explore. The Japanese Tea Garden features zen rock formations and waterfalls; the Asian-style Pond Garden is perfect for taking tranquil views of koi fish swimming below lily pads. The Family Rose Garden offers visitors a chance to get up close with some rare breeds like Old English Roses or Grandiflora Hydrangeas.

It’s a great place to take photos and enjoy nature while spending time with friends or family. The garden displays many different flowers throughout all seasons, making visiting this hidden gem worth your time anytime during the year! There are also walking trails for those who like to get fresh air and exercise simultaneously.

History of Kubota Garden

Kubota Garden is a hidden gem in Seattle. It’s a Japanese-style garden located on the Washington Park Arboretum grounds and surrounded by enormous trees, making it feel like its own little oasis from the rest of the world. The tranquil beauty of this place has been drawing visitors for decades now, with many making annual visits. The history of Kubota Garden is as beautiful as the garden itself, and it’s a fascinating story that has been shared by many now, but there are still some things you may not know about this place.

Kubota Garden was started by Fujitaro Kubota back in 1927 when he immigrated from Japan. He used his carpentry skills to build several structures on the land, including The Pagoda, which still stands tall today as one of its main attractions. After years of exploring this beautiful space with friends and family members, he decided that others should be able to share their beauty too. So in 1974, he donated the land to The Seattle Parks Department.

Kubota Garden is located in Seattle’s Washington Park Arboretum Visitors can access the garden throughout the year, noting that it closes for a few weeks during winter months from late November through early January. Kubota Garden hosts annual events such as Chrysanthemum Show & Sale held each September and an outdoor concert series every summer on Friday evenings, plus many other special occasions. The park has been designated a National Historic Landmark by the United States Department of the Interior because of its essential role in changing Japanese American culture around World War II. With these facts about this beautiful place, let us now discuss what to expect when you visit Kubota Gardens.

Kubota Garden is filled with plants brought over by the original owner Mr. Juki I Kubota, in 1927. However, there are many more additions to this already lush garden which you will see as soon as you arrive at your destination. As far as green life goes, one can expect to find and throughout the gardens and Japanese Maple Trees near each peaceful place entrance. There are also planted around various plots within the park because they symbolize truth and purity, but only if they make it through the winter months; otherwise, they look like dead sticks sticking up out of the ground – these need special care, so be sure not to trip on them! When walking around, notice how well organized and maintained everything is; Kubota garden even has and a rockery for those who love stone.

Things you may not know about the Kubota Garden

The first thing most people don’t realize is how young Kubota Garden is. It was only established in 1974 when Audrey M. Kubota donated the land known as Kubota Garden to The Seattle Parks Department. Audrey had established her own company, which was at one point the largest importer of Japanese plants in North America, and she wanted to share some of this beauty with everyone who visited Washington Park Arboretum.

The next thing you may not know about Kubota Garden is its unique place within its surrounding area. You see, though many people enjoy coming here for different reasons all year round, there are certain times when they love visiting more than others because of the beautiful blooms on display during these particular seasons. For example, if you happen to visit during springtime, you will witness a fantastic flower show. Everything here is covered with beautiful blooms of different colors, including the trees.

If you happen to visit Kubota Garden during summertime, you will notice something extraordinary about this place that makes it even more special than usual. You see, many people come just for the sake of enjoying its scenery, but some love coming here because they want to admire these unique plants and flowers without all of the gorgeous colorful displays surrounding them. So what do they do? They come in autumn when everything has died away so their true beauty can truly be appreciated! Finally, the wintertime at Kubota Garden is another excellent time to visit if you enjoy admiring nature’s serenity. The snow covers everything, giving off a calm, peaceful feeling like no other.

Events at the Kubota Garden

There are many things to do in Kubota Garden in Seattle. There is a Japanese garden, waterfall, and koi ponds that visitors can enjoy. Visitors can also stop at the gift shop for souvenirs or browse the park bookstore called The Little Seed, including children’s books about nature and gardening. Visitors will find themselves surrounded by beautiful flowers blooming year-round while walking through this oasis within an urban cityscape. This hidden gem is only minutes away from downtown Seattle, so there isn’t any excuse not to visit.

In the summer, Kubota Garden has a weekly concert series that is free to attend. There are also classes and workshops offered for adults and children, covering topics such as art, gardening, and cooking kimonos. The garden hosts events throughout the year, including an annual Sakura Matsuri Cherry Blossom Festival in April where visitors can eat traditional Japanese foods, listen to live music from local musicians and catch performances by dancers dressed in full-length kimono robes or happi coats with colorful patterns of cranes dancing across them. In August, there is a moon-viewing festival called Tanabata during which people write wishes on small pieces of paper they tie onto bamboo leaves; these wishes will be placed under the light of candles around the pond after dark.

In the fall, a Chrysanthemum Show is held where visitors can view and purchase potted mums along with other beautiful flowers from local vendors. In February, the garden hosts an annual Lantern Festival that includes taiko drummers and chanters who sing folk songs accompanied by dancers dressed in colorful happi coats. Visitors are also welcome to participate in the performances. There is no fee for this event, but reservations are required to prepare enough food for everyone.

In addition to these events, there are many volunteer opportunities available at the garden, such as being a docent and giving tours of the park, being a garden interpreter and helping visitors navigate the map of the garden, or help with community outreach projects. There is also an active gardening club where people can learn more about gardening and meet others who share their passion.

In the winter, Kubota Garden hosts a Winter Wonderland event where visitors can see a life-sized model train village, a carousel, and a snow play area. There is also an indoor space where children can receive storytime from local volunteers and have the opportunity to make crafts during this event.

Visitors planning on going out in Seattle should take advantage of being so close to Kubota Garden! You won’t regret it! We guarantee that you will be impressed by its scenery no matter what season you decide to go around with your friends or family members.

Address: 9817 55th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98118, United States
Hours:
Monday 6am–10pm
Tuesday 6am–10pm
Wednesday 6am–10pm
Thursday 6am–10pm
Friday 6am–10pm
Saturday 6am–10pm
Sunday 6am–10pm

Phone: +1 206-725-5060
Website: kubotagarden.org

If you’re looking for House Cleaning Service in Seattle, you can book with us!

Next Thing To Do in Seattle:

Smith Tower

 

Kubota Garden in Seattle WA

 

NW Maids Cleaning Service

Things To Do in Seattle – Smith Tower

Smith Tower in Seattle WA

Smith Tower in Seattle is a gorgeous building that was built back in 1914. The Smith Tower has been the tallest building west of the Mississippi since construction and still stands majestically today. Here are ten reasons why you should visit this iconic landmark:

1) It’s an architectural wonder. The Smith Tower is modeled after the Campanile at St Mark’s Square in Venice, Italy, and features a beautiful marble lobby with mosaic tile floors and ornate bronze chandeliers.

2) Apartments available for rent. This historic gem also houses some apartments on its upper floors, and they come fully furnished! Visitors can see what life was like during the 1920s by peaking these homes from another era.

3) Views from the observatory deck. The observation deck on the 35th floor offers a 360-degree view of Seattle and its surroundings, including Mount Rainier to the southeast and Puget Sound to the west.

4) The Smith Tower is open to the public, and you can enjoy a self-guided tour of its Art Deco architecture at no charge.

5) Gourmet restaurant and a speakeasy. The building has been transformed into a destination with multiple dining options. One of which is the famous Chinese Room serving traditional Cantonese cuisine in an ornate setting inspired by China’s Forbidden City.

6) The world’s first elevators. The Smith Tower was the first building west of the Mississippi River and second in America to have a high-speed elevator, putting it at the forefront of skyscraper construction technology.

7) Museum on the ground floor. The Tower is home to an authentic working Otis elevator built-in 1892, and it’s open for visitors to see every day from 12-12:30 pm.

8) Iconic neon sign. The iconic blue and green neon signs were installed in the 1940s and have become a point of pride for Seattleites, making them an essential photo op while visiting Smith Tower.

9) A hidden speakeasy. The 36th floor of Smith Tower is home to a secret bar called Upstairs, which serves handcrafted cocktails in the style of speak-easies from 1920s Prohibition times.

10) Free wifi. Visitors can enjoy free wifi while exploring the building.

History of Smith Tower in Seattle Smith Tower

Smith Tower in Seattle was completed in 1914 and remained one of only a small handful of buildings over 30 stories tall built before 1960. The installation takes its name from Lyman Cornelius Smith. He had humble beginnings as an orphaned farm boy in Ohio and found the L.C. Smith and Brothers Typewriter Company, which became a leading typewriter retailer in late 19th-century America.

Smith Tower is an iconic Seattle landmark, built when Seattle’s population had grown from 30,000 to over 300,000 people within two decades – mainly due to thriving local businesses like The Bon Marché and Nordstrom. It remained the tallest office tower on the West Coast for nearly 40 years until surpassed by another Northwesterner: Columbia Center penthouse tenant Bill Gates’ Microsoft Corporation (not coincidentally headquartered in Redmond).

Facts about the Smith Tower

The Smith Tower is a skyscraper in Lower Queen Anne that was completed in 1914. It stands 208 feet high and has 28 floors. Did you know it’s also one of the oldest skyscrapers on the West Coast?

Smith Tower is the oldest skyscraper in Seattle, WA. The tower was built for $350,000 and has been renovated since 1979-1980. Smith Tower was also the first building taller than 200 feet outside of New York City or Chicago. It had a postcard view from 1922 until 1962 when construction began on Space Needle, obscuring that view. There are two blacksmith shops still located inside Smith Tower which were moved there during World War II due to metal rationing by the US government (hence why it’s called Smith). Despite being known as “the world’s tallest unreinforced concrete structure,” you can find steel beams within its walls hidden behind brickwork; this is because the tower was initially designed to be an all-steel structure, but the cost and material shortages during World War I altered those plans. The first two observation decks were on the 35th and 36th floors; they’ve since been converted into offices.

The Smith Tower is the oldest skyscraper in Seattle, WA. It was initially completed on June 30th, 1914, and officially opened to the public on July 14th, 1914. The smith tower was built by Colonel Eli L. Brown, who named it after his father Lucien P. Smith (1845-1920) because he had passed away before its completion date of June 30th, 1914. Aside from being a place for business within Seattle, WA., it also served as an observation deck that provided views of Mt Rainier and Puget Sound. Initially, there were two chandeliers inside each elevator car; they are now located at different places throughout the building due to renovations, making them unsuitable for their original locations. The smith tower is the tallest building of all time in Seattle, WA., with its height at 42 floors and approximately 450 ft tall, which was considered an extreme novelty during that period. With so many renovations over time, it still holds on strong as one of the best places for business within Seattle but only has office space rather than the public observation deck anymore.

Attractions at Smith Tower

You can still see many features that made this skyscraper state-of-the-art 100 years ago, such as Otis elevators with their original hand cranks and brass door closures, decorative terra-cotta exterior, and an Italian Renaissance design complete with four corner towers. *Visiting Smith Tower in Seattle Today The Tower is home to a collection of shops and restaurants that reflect the style and elegance of the building’s history: Monorail Espresso (the city’s first espresso bar), Sky View Observatory, Noiselab Brewery & Taproom, Classico Enoteca Pizzeria, Heaven on Seven Southern Food Restaurant, etc.

Other Things to Do Nearby

Among other things, you can do nearby include visiting Pike Place Market or Pioneer Square. You can also take a walking tour around downtown Seattle’s many historic buildings, such as Washington State Convention Center, Showbox Sodo, Columbia Center Building, Alaska Way Viaduct, etc.

How to go to the Smith Tower

Smith Tower has located at 506 2nd Ave, Seattle, WA 98104, United States. It’s easily accessible via public transportation or even by foot if you are so inclined! The Smith Tower is open Wednesday through Sunday from 3 pm to 10 – 11 pm. There are five elevators in Smith Tower that can take you up to the 35th-floor observation deck (with a quick stop on each intervening floor). The elevator ride takes about 30 seconds! You’ll find restrooms on the second floor if you need them. The first two floors are open to the public for free; however, there is a fee that ranges from $16 – $19 for adults (ages 13 and up) who wish to visit the 35th-floor observation deck (and don’t forget your ID!). There may be additional fees associated with some special events held in the Tower, but this varies depending on what is happening.

Address: 506 2nd Ave, Seattle, WA 98104, United States
Hours:
Monday Closed
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday 3–10pm
Thursday 3–10pm
Friday 3–11pm
Saturday Closed
Sunday 3–10pm

Phone: +1 206-624-0414
Website: smithtower.com

If you’re looking for House Cleaning Service in Seattle, you can book with us!

Next Thing To Do in Seattle:

Henry Art Gallery

 

Smith Tower in Seattle WA

 

 

NW Maids Cleaning Service

Things To Do in Seattle – Henry Art Gallery

Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, WA

What to see at Henry Art Gallery in Seattle? That is the question you are asking yourself right now. Well, we have some suggestions for you! You should visit this gallery and enjoy what it has to offer. We recommend that you start with the installation called “Stuffed Animals.” It will change your perspective on stuffed animals forever! Here, you will find out if you keep on reading!

History of Henry Art Gallery

The University of Washington established the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle. The museum opened its doors on February 15, 1927. Henry Art Gallery in Seattle is part of the University of Washington. It was founded by Dr. Richard Fuller, who also helped to establish The Seattle Art Museum. It now has been offering visitors a chance to experience modern art ever since.

It is located on a beautiful spot with views over Lake Union, making for an atmospheric backdrop that enhances your visit if you attend one of their many events or exhibitions. They have rotating art shows from both national and international artists, with an emphasis on modern art.

The gallery is housed in a building designed by Carl Gould of Skidmore Owings and Merrill LLP, who was inspired by the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. The use of natural materials used to build it is typical for Northwest-style architecture, which also means that you will see plenty of wood incorporated into the design and large expanses of glass so visitors can enjoy views out over Lake Union during their visit.

The Henry Art Gallery is located in University District on the campus of the UW. It was founded at a university-owned site as an educational resource for students and faculty members to study aesthetics, art history, and contemporary cultural criticism. The Seattle Art Museum occupies the first five floors with 19 galleries that display over 40 permanent collections worldwide. Visitors can also view new exhibitions each year highlighting works by local artists alongside international names like David Hockney’s “Bridge” series or Anselm Kiefer’s large-scale installation “Sunflower Seeds,” which has been displayed since 2010. There are free guided tours every day except Wednesdays, where visitors can learn more about the galleries and exhibitions on display.

What to See on Henry Art Gallery?

Henry Art Gallery in Seattle provides you with a unique opportunity to see some of the best modern art from local and international artists. It is an excellent place for all visitors, whether you are an art lover or want somewhere interesting to spend a few hours. The gallery has been offering many different events throughout the year, including lectures, music performances, and workshops that allow people to experiment with some of the featured media.

One of the main things to see at Henry Art Gallery in Seattle is their “Art on Campus” exhibition, which offers a chance for students to showcase their work.

The “Henry Art Gallery 100” exhibition is a rotating display of work from one hundred artists who have been featured at Henry.

The museum also has an extensive permanent collection that includes pieces by Andy Warhol and William Baziotes.

It houses an impressive collection of works by Northwest artists like Guy Anderson, Kenneth Callahan, Mark Tobey, and Morris Graves. It’s also got lots of photography which it presents both in its permanent exhibitions and through special exhibits that change every six months or so.

The gallery’s excellent location makes it ideal for enjoying your visit with family or friends, whether you are looking forward to one of their many events or want somewhere interesting during your free time.

Facts about the Henry Art Gallery

Seattle’s Henry Art Gallery is one of the oldest art galleries in Washington State. It was founded by Anna Herkner, who also served as its first director, and opened to the public on May 18th, 1961.

Today, this museum houses more than 15,000 works of modern art, including pieces from Andy Warhol and Robert Rauschenberg. This museum is known for its American Art collection, including artists like Andrew Wyeth and Georgia O’Keefe. The building has gone through several renovations over time but still maintains its original appearance due to a significant restoration project completed in 1996. In addition to all these facts about the Henry Art Gallery are some interesting figures – the total square footage of this gallery totals at around 27 thousand square feet, and yearly attendance is more than 100 thousand visitors.

The museum is one of the oldest art galleries in Washington State. It was founded by Anna Herkner, who also served as its first director, and opened to the public on May 18th, 1961. Today, this museum houses more than 15,000 works of modern art, including pieces from Andy Warhol and Robert Rauschenberg. This museum is known for its American Art collection, including artists like Andrew Wyeth and Georgia O’Keefe. The building has gone through several renovations over time but still maintains its original appearance due to a significant restoration project completed in 1996. In addition to all these facts about the Henry Art Gallery are some interesting figures – the total square footage of this gallery totals at around 27 thousand square feet, and yearly attendance is more than 100 thousand visitors.

The henry art gallery in Seattle has more than 18,000 objects and includes works from Andy Warhol to Ai Weiwei. The Center for Art + Environment hosts residencies that explore man-environment relationships. Some programs focus on fostering creativity through lectures, workshops, seminars, classes, performances, and special events.

The museum hosts lectures from various speakers, including artists, scientists, writers, and scholars.
There are also different temporary exhibitions which take place throughout the year. The henry art gallery in Seattle is open seven days a week with free admission to all events. Special programs for students include artist talks, family-friendly activities, and school tours that feature docents who work in education.

The Henry Art Gallery’s mission statement says it “provides access to contemporary ideas through its dynamic program of changing exhibits.”

The Henry has a little cafe with really delicious sandwiches served on the bread they bake themselves at their bakery next door (seriously!). The baked goods are just as good as what you can find at Macrina Bakery but for half the price! I love to get there early before all the goodies run out because they usually sell out within 30 minutes after opening, if not sooner. And yes, they do serve delicious hot coffee with that tasty bread.

Address: 15th Ave NE & University of Washington, NE 41st St, Seattle, WA 98195, United States
Hours:
Monday Closed
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday Closed
Thursday 10am–7pm
Friday 10am–5pm
Saturday 10am–5pm
Sunday 10am–5pm

Phone: +1 206-543-2280
Website: henryart.org

If you’re looking for House Cleaning Service in Seattle, you can book with us!

Next Thing To Do in Seattle:

National Nordic Museum

 

Henry Art Gallery in Seattle WA

 

NW Maids Cleaning Service

Things To Do in Seattle – National Nordic Museum

National Nordic Museum in Seattle, WA

Nordic Museum in Seattle, WA, is a great place to go on a cold winter day. This museum provides an exciting and educational experience for all visitors of any age. There are many things to do here, from watching films about Nordic cultures, playing games with Viking children, or even browsing through the vast collection of artifacts from each country.

It is dedicated to preserving and sharing Scandinavian heritage through artifacts, artworks, textiles, music, literature, and folk culture. The museum’s collection includes more than 15000 items spanning 1500 years! Two permanent galleries highlight the cultures of Denmark (Denmark) and Norway. The museum also hosts various exhibits that change throughout the year, so there’s always something new to see!

Here are ten fun activities you can enjoy at this museum:

  1. Watching movies about Nordic culture
  2. Visiting the Viking village and playing games with kids dressed as Vikings!
  3. Playing board games that teach you how to speak Norwegian!
  4. Browsing through the vast collection of artifacts from each country.
  5. Having a snack in one of their cafes or restaurants!
  6. You are renting out space for your private events!
  7. They were taking tours to learn more about Nordic history and culture.
  8. Visit the gift shop to take home souvenirs with you!
  9. Visiting during any holiday season because they have special activities at certain times throughout the year (such as an Easter egg hunt, Halloween trick or treating, etc.)
  10. They are also participating in the Nordic Museum’s many events and exhibits.

What exhibits does National Nordic Museum have?

There are many different interactive opportunities for children at the National Nordic Museum. They can dress up like Vikings if they’d like, do hands-on crafts while learning about their history through cultural lessons inspired by Scandinavian culture, and it’s an educational museum that you will enjoy because of how immersive it is! There aren’t many places that can say all of these things after being visited by families from all over the world. The National Nordic Museum in Seattle has been bringing people together since it opened decades ago. Still, now kids get to learn about their ancestors thousands of years ago when they visit today during education programs where they’ll experience what life was like back then!

Kids will love this museum because they get to immerse themselves in another way of life that is different than what they’re used to seeing every day! This museum is exceptionally educational and tons of fun at the same time, so it doesn’t feel like work when you’re there learning something new! The only problem you’ll have with the National Nordic Museum is deciding which exhibit to see first!

It’s educational, but also tons of fun! There aren’t many places that can say that about themselves after being visited by families from all over the world! The National Nordic Museum in Seattle has been bringing people together since it opened decades ago. Now children will be able to experience what life was like for their ancestors thousands of years ago when they visit today! It offers a ton of interactive opportunities for them and provides education programs where your child gets hands-on learning experiences inspired by Scandinavian culture! It’s an educational museum that they will enjoy, which is the perfect combination.

What to bring to the National Nordic Museum?

Water bottle: the museum has plenty of water fountains throughout its different sections to keep you hydrated! -Snacks: there are a few places at the beginning where there’s space for sitting and enjoying some snacks from home or a quick snack run at one of the many cafes in the area.

Bug spray: Several exhibits have insects, so you might want to bring bug spray if they’re not your favorite animals!

Sunscreen: The museum has many windows, and it’s located outside, so sunscreen is helpful for this location.

Camera or cell phone: The museum has several permanent and temporary exhibits that you’ll want to take photos of!

Raincoat: Even though Seattle doesn’t rain much in the summer, it can be a little unpredictable, so having a coat or umbrella with you is recommended.

What not to bring in the National Nordic Museum?

Pets: I know this is a hard one, but there are areas in the museum that don’t allow pets even if they’re on a leash. It’s for your pet’s safety as well as other visitors’ who might be afraid of animals.

Food or drinks: There aren’t many places where you can eat at the museum, so you might not want to bring food because it could get ruined. And if you’re looking for a snack run, there are cafes in the area that sell snacks and drinks!

Large bags: The museum doesn’t allow any large bags or backpacks through the entrance, so if you have a big bag with you, it will need to be checked at the front desk. If this is your situation, make sure to go early for them to get everything squared away before they open!
It is important to note that it is banned in the museum, so if you choose to bring your food and drink, be sure not to leave them unattended.

What does the National Nordic Museum Offer?

The museum has an excellent selection of books and other items for sale. A map can help you find your way around the exhibits, as well as the cafe and gift shop. Even if you don’t plan to buy something from their store, they have a fantastic window display called “Drawn by Ice.” It changes throughout the year and is always worth a look.

This museum has many family-friendly activities, such as story time every Saturday at 11:00 am in their frosty cafe. If you turn up to hear it when they aren’t doing one, don’t worry – there’s plenty to do and see while you wait! You can also find a list of events on their website. The museum is frequently updated with new exhibits and has something exciting going on every day!

For example, if you’re there during February, they will be holding an ice carving exhibition (and competition). No matter when you go, it’s always worth checking out what will be happening.

Location and Admission

The National Nordic Museum is in Seattle, Washington. It is located at 2655 NW Market St, Seattle, WA 98107, USA. The admission ticket fee range from is $10 – $15.

Address: 2655 NW Market St, Seattle, WA 98107, United States
Hours:
Monday Closed
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday 10am–5pm
Thursday 10am–5pm
Friday 10am–5pm
Saturday 10am–5pm
Sunday 10am–5pm

Phone: +1 206-789-5707
Website: nordicmuseum.org

If you’re looking for House Cleaning Service in Seattle, you can book with us!

Next Thing To Do in Seattle:

Lake Union

 

National Nordic Museum in Seattle WA

 

NW Maids Cleaning Service

Things To Do in Seattle – Lake Union

Lake Union in Seattle, WA

Lake Union is a saltwater lake in Seattle, WA. It’s the third largest of all lakes within Puget Sound and was once home to Native Americans who used it as a trading post for centuries before Europeans discovered it. Today, it stands as an icon that reflects this city’s history and natural beauty that rises from the waters.

A great deal can be seen moving across this lake via one or more floating bridges built over each arm, separating them from their respective landmasses. In contrast, numerous smaller bridges span these same arms allowing access between roadways located on either side of the lake.

Lake Union is a freshwater lake in Seattle, Washington. It has many public transportation options, including the streetcar, which you can ride for free to get from downtown to Lake Union and back! You will also see people kayaking on the lake and rowing boats with their boathouse right there on the water’s edge. If you want something more relaxing than biking or walking along with one of the city’s great greenways, then you can sit back and take a boat ride. There is even an old steamboat that still runs around the lake and numerous rental boats available to the public.

History of the Lake Union

On the United States’ West Coast, Lake Union in Seattle, Washington was once a shallow glacial freshwater lake. The city of Seattle has grown up around Lake Union, and it is an essential part of its history. Before Europeans settled in the area, Native Americans lived near Lake Union for centuries before European settlement. A new dam built across Portage Creek made this one large body of water which would be named after David Denny’s friend Samuel S Lake who owned most of what is now known as Capitol Hill’s streets east from Volunteer Park, including John McGilvra, Marion St., Lynn St., Melrose Ave., Olive Way (pre-dating Aurora), Terry Avenue Addition through Madison Park Later another small hill between this lake and Lake Washington was named after him as well. The first non-Native American settler in the Seattle area, a White man from Kentucky by the name of Henry Van Asselt who built his cabin on Westlake Avenue near where it intersects with Denny Way at about what is today Boren Ave., but he would soon move up to another small glacial hill now known as Leschi Park which overlooked this newly formed larger body of water. David Denny joined them within several years, followed quickly by Arthur A. Denny across the valley on a bluff later called Capitol Hill (and originally Beacon Hill). Their streets were carved out, naming many for those early settlers, including an extension eastward that became John & Thomas Streets Addition through Madison Park.

The Lake Union in Seattle, Washington, was formed from the waters of Puget Sound when a dam built across Portage Creek made this one large body of water with two connecting lakes to its east and west. Native Americans lived near Lake Union for centuries before European settlement by Henry Van Asselt. He settled on Westlake Avenue near where it intersects today with Denny Way just south of Boren Ave. Still, he would soon move up to another small glacial hill known as Leschi Park, which overlooked this newly formed larger body of water. David Denny joined them within several years, followed quickly by Arthur A. Denny across the valley on a bluff later called Capitol Hill (and originally Beacon Hill). Their streets were carved out, naming many for those early settlers, including an extension eastward that became John & Thomas Streets Addition through Madison Park.

Today Lake Union in Seattle, WA, is home to several shipyards and marinas as well as the center of a large maritime industry which includes seaplane operations (Kenmore Air Harbor) on its southern shore at Kenmore along with Boeing’s largest airplane assembly plant, which sits just south of the Ship Canal connecting it to Puget Sound near where they both meet Shilshole Bay. A great deal of traffic can be seen moving across this lake via one or more floating bridges built over each arm, separating them from their respective landmasses. In contrast, numerous smaller-sized bridges span these same arms allowing access between roadways located on either side of the lake.

Things To do in Lake Union

Lake Union is a bustling business and leisure hub, with plenty to see and do for locals and visitors alike. From scenic views to unique shopping opportunities, Lake Union has it all. If you’re looking for something new to try in the area, here are five things you should add to your bucket list!

1) Visit Gas Works Park: This park offers fantastic views of the Seattle skyline, as well as a fascinating history involving old gasification plants that operated on this site from 1906-1956. There’s also a cafe within the park if you need a quick refuel before heading out again!

2) Take a Sailboat Ride on Lake Union: Boats have been used to get around the area for many years. You can take this mode of transport yourself by hiring out one of the sailboats available for rent!

3) Go Shopping at the Lakeshore Ave A.C. Moore: This specialty craft store offers an impressive selection of arts and crafts supplies, as well as a variety of classes for those who want to perfect their technique before venturing out on their own!

4) Get a Bird’s Eye View of Lake Union: Seattle is a city that offers a plethora of ways to enjoy the spectacular views it has to offer, and you can now add another option to your list by hiring one of the many helicopters available for tours around Lake Union!

5) Take a Cruise on the Lake Union Princess: This boat has been offering tours of Seattle from many different perspectives for more than thirty years. Cruises include sight-seeing options that pass some of Seattle’s most famous landmarks and special dinner/lunch cruises for those who want to enjoy their trip in style!

How to visit the Lake Union

Lake Union in Seattle, Washington, is located just east of downtown between its northern shore at Broad St., Westlake Ave., and Fairview Ave. It was formed from the waters of Puget Sound when a dam built across Portage Creek made this one large body of water with two connecting lakes to its east and west. Today Lake Union in Seattle, WA, provides much-needed waterfront property for various business activities as well as an essential part of their history along with many other surrounding neighborhoods named after early settlers, including but not limited to Fremont (named for John C Fremont), Cascade District, Eastlake (for Arthur Denny’s friend George W Eastlake who had earlier founded Columbus); Queen Anne Hill; Capitol Hill & Madison Park along with Lake Union.

Visiting the Lake Union in Seattle, WA, is straightforward by car due to its proximity to downtown, where parking can be found almost anywhere within a block or two from the lake itself, which makes it ideal for walking around taking in all the sites and sounds coming off this beautiful body of water. Most importantly, visitors should make sure they take advantage of all the free tours available for this lake, including a narrated boat tour (Lake Union Cruise) offered by Argosy Cruises that leaves from both Pier 55 and Seacrest Park.

Another critical thing to point out about Lake Union in Seattle, WA, is its proximity to one of three locks built on the West Coast, allowing boats access between Puget Sound & Salmon Bay while also providing an easy way to move cargo up & downhill when water levels are high or low depending upon what season it may be at any given time with them currently being open roughly 260 days each year. However, they were opened 178 days during 2013 due primarily to our current drought conditions across most Western Washington State, especially around Olympia, where their snowpack is now at only 57% of normal.

The final and most important thing to point out about Lake Union in Seattle, WA is that it’s the main focus around the annual Seafair celebration held each July, which includes hydroplane races (at least they used too), sailing regattas as well as a big air show featuring both military & civilian aircraft along with many other activities including but not limited to parades & parties. The best way for visitors interested in attending these events is by taking advantage of unique shuttles leaving from downtown hotels or anywhere else within walking distance of their nearest stop providing transportation directly to either Gas Works Park located on the north end running roughly parallel across its northern shore or at Key Arena near Seattle Center where all this activity takes place.

Location: Seattle, Washington, U.S.
Coordinates: 47.6392°N 122.3337°W
Surface area: 580 acres (2.3 km2)
Average depth: 34 feet (10 m)
Max. depth: 50 feet (15 m)
Water volume: 20,000 acre-feet (25,000,000 m3)

If you’re looking for Seattle’s House Cleaning Service, you can book with us!

Next Thing To Do in Seattle:

Bellevue Botanical Garden

 

Lake Union in Seattle WA

 

NW Maids Cleaning Service

Book a Cleaning in 60 Seconds